Miriam makes her point

Emphatically, as always. In taking to task the prosecution team in the C.J. Corona impeachment trial for their scattershot approach which led to the sudden and unceremonious withdrawal of 5 of the 8 articles of impeachment, Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago let loose with a few choice and colorful words.  Just Miriam being Miriam, the other senator-judges seemed to say, until Atty. Vitaliano Aguirre signaled his displeasure by a contemptuous act which he defiantly stood by. An even bigger uproar ensued.

Which led to Fr. Catalino Arevalo, S.J., in a homily at the EDSA Shrine, to denounce Miriam as worthy of the fires of hell for having called the members of the prosecution panel “fools”. This according to the Bible. Never one to suffer fools gladly, Miriam was quick with a retort. The Constitution provides a wall of separation between Church and State, said she, and a priest cannot violate the law in the guise of criticizing a senator-judge with the ulterior motive of promoting his own (presumably anti-Corona) political agenda. Moreover, the Bible can be interpreted in an almost infinite number of ways. Even the devil can quote scripture to suit his ends, she might have added.

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Revive blog and Constitutional law

The time has come to revive my moribund blog. I stopped writing and posting as the well had run dry, so to speak, and I found myself at loose ends as to whether I wanted to continue blogging or not.
But the most gripping legal drama of the decade began to unfold over the past two months and I felt the urge not to let the event go unremarked.

My views are, to borrow Thomas Merton’s phrase, that of a “guilty bystander”. I am guilty of many things, not least of which is a recurring apathy and indifference towards events swirling around me, and an unhealthy tendency to focus on my own peculiar miseries. What Merton called “a spurious self-isolation in a special world”. This is an attempt to break out of my shell and once again engage with the world at large. If only through the blogosphere.

For starters I wanted to write about something arid yet compelling, oftentimes insufficiently understood but nowadays a subject of much heated debate — constitutional law. I am far from being an expert, or even an assiduous student, of the Constitution. Yet it is my conceit that I have something worthwhile to say on the subject, if only from the point of view a curious observer.

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Public Deaths

Death is one of the most universal of taboos. Not the rituals of grief, burial and mourning which are many, varied and almost always public in character. I mean the actual act of dying. This most mysterious of earthly transitions is done in private, even for the most well-known of persons, with a few family and close friends in attendance and maybe a man or woman of God around to ease the way.

Public deaths, on the other hand, serve a social purpose. For instance, public executions are meant to be cathartic events in which society extracts its pound of flesh, as it were. It supposedly serves as a deterrent to criminal or aberrant behavior and reflects the manner by which justice is served within a community. It’s also morbidly entertaining and can even be interactive, such as in the practice of stoning or the spectators’ participation in the gory events in the Roman Colosseum.

Other public deaths, such as the assassination of Ninoy Aquino, serve as a catalyst for social upheaval and change.

Suicide is a more complicated phenomenon in which no easy generalizations can be made. It can be done privately or in plain of view others, but even the most secretive act of taking one’s life assumes a public aspect upon the discovery of the body. The act itself is shocking under any circumstance, being so contrary to what we normally know and expect of human behavior. Thus, the ripple effects of a suicide extend beyond the immediate family or social circle of the victim to the society at large. I knowingly use the word “victim” as I believe those who kill themselves are casualties of one or another of life’s events which makes continued living unbearable. However, some suicides are more publicly significant that others. Continue reading “Public Deaths”

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